Model Operator

Still Cadaver 1How does one go about learning to be an Osteopath? What does one need to know? First and foremost a thorough knowledge of functional anatomy is absolutely required (functional anatomy includes physiology in my mind). The principles governing body functions are necessary knowledge as well. Knowing those two broad topics may leave someone out in the cold if they have no exposure to actual hands-on methods. The dilemma for the Principles based teacher or practitioner is how to introduce hands-on methods without having the student taking the demonstrated method as the only way to actually apply treatment? Further to that, how does the Principles based teacher or practitioner bridge the gap between telling a student that they NEED to do something a SPECIFIC way while they are learning it to ensure safety and once they have mastered that method they are required to create their own way? Continue reading

Where Did The Progress Go?

American FlagMy father was an American. My father was a wrestler (he had several scholarship offers but got drafted in to the Navy during the Vietnam War), a boxer, and a running back. He often told me when I was young that if I did not enjoy the feeling of getting punched in the face that I should not fight. When I took martial arts I was taught that the first principle of conflict was that if I was unwilling to match the intensity of my opponent and accept the worst possible outcome that I should not enter the conflict. I am writing what follows in response to an exchange I had on Facebook with a member of the Institute of Classical Osteopathy on the Society for Osteopathic Wellness page. Continue reading