Contact is Control: Wrapping and Reinforcing Holds

IMG_1484.JPGThe video below highlights holds that wrap one arm of the practitioner wrapping around the limb of the patient to be reinforced by the other limb of the practitioner for increased control. There are common analogues for this type of hold found in many grappling systems which is why there is an accompanying video from a gentleman named Ryan Hall. The aim is to show the similarity in holds and that the concept of contact is control as well as relational motion (one thing stays still while one thing moves in relation to it) occur any time you are attempting to control the body of another person for therapeutic purposes or otherwise.

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Map Building

IMG_1418The video presented here describes the development of a sensorimotor point map alongside an error map in order to improve the capacity to locate things. The combination of sensory feedback and motor output are essential qualities of manual therapy of any kind such that understanding how we may develop the capacity to integrate those things and build the ability to find structures is likely useful.

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Avoid Explicit Confusion…

IMG_1439The video presented below speaks about explicit and implicit learning processes. For the purposes of students in manual therapy (or any motor learning environment) it will be generally stated that explicit learning is quite flexible so it is EASY to confuse someone if contradictory or poor feedback is provided. The flexibility of explicit learning, which is very important in the early stages of skill acquisition, may provide an opportunity for correction of poor feedback or instruction however it would be ideal to avoid that through consistent instruction that respects the best information available about learning strategies. Please enjoy the general overview of implicit and explicit learning.

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Plan for Uncertainty

IMG_1329Continuing to identify research that may have clinical application we find a paper here that speaks about flexible motor planning with task uncertainty. Through the paper we are able to identify the general phenomenon that motor planning in task uncertainty tends towards the mid-line of the participant and then alters from there. The video below describes how to take that information and utilize it to make a purposeful plan when a practitioner is not able to see their target (a concept which is encompassed in the concepts of patient positioning and palpation whereby, if those are utilized, this is less of a problem).

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