Old School Cranial…

IMG_1785

Here we utilize a description of working on the nasal bones from Osteopathy: Research and Practice (1910). The description of working on the nasal bones allows for demonstration of the described method as well as discussion and expansion of the concept. Common perceptual issues on the part of the practitioner are also discussed.

Continue reading

Old School Hip Work…

IMG_1776

Here we utilize a description from Osteopathy: Research and Practice (1910) as the starting point for a demonstration and discussion. We demonstrate what the method likely looked/looks like while also identifying how the concepts of Contact is Control and Relational Motion may be identified in the description/demonstration. In identifying the concepts we understand how, as heuristics and guidelines, the concepts of Relational Motion and Contact is Control are able to guide treatment methods for effectiveness and safety.

Continue reading

Lever, Wedge, and Screw…

IMG_1656

Within osteopathic manual therapy, there is discussion surrounding the concepts of lever, wedge, and screw based on their mention in the writing of A.T. Still. I have written about the concepts previously and now have chosen to use video to demonstrate the concepts in a broad fashion. Please enjoy.

Continue reading

Begin With “I Don’t Know”

IMG_0656The investigative mind seems to require the ability to say “I don’t know”. From the starting point of “I don’t know” investigation may begin. Being honest with the limitations of facts or knowledge is extremely useful…we don’t begin with a conclusion. We may have useful information that points in a direction but, if we are not honest about the limits of that information, we may take it as information that is stronger than the limitations which it presents.

Continue reading

Osteopathy is to be Discovered…

AtstillseatedAs the title I chose states, Osteopathy is to be discovered. I make that statement for 3 reasons:

  1. Being an Osteopathic Operator is a process of consistent evolution regardless of whether or not one is attempting to grow, they are forced to grow through experience (if they don’t grow they are ignorant of themselves on a daily basis)
  2. My training at the Canadian Academy of Osteopathy showed me this through the thoughts and discussions I have had with Robert Johnston who demonstrated this to me through his teaching and ideas
  3. Dr. Still told anyone that chooses to read his books that it is to be discovered!

Continue reading

Model Operator

Still Cadaver 1How does one go about learning to be an Osteopath? What does one need to know? First and foremost a thorough knowledge of functional anatomy is absolutely required (functional anatomy includes physiology in my mind). The principles governing body functions are necessary knowledge as well. Knowing those two broad topics may leave someone out in the cold if they have no exposure to actual hands-on methods. The dilemma for the Principles based teacher or practitioner is how to introduce hands-on methods without having the student taking the demonstrated method as the only way to actually apply treatment? Further to that, how does the Principles based teacher or practitioner bridge the gap between telling a student that they NEED to do something a SPECIFIC way while they are learning it to ensure safety and once they have mastered that method they are required to create their own way? Continue reading

Where Did The Progress Go?

American FlagMy father was an American. My father was a wrestler (he had several scholarship offers but got drafted in to the Navy during the Vietnam War), a boxer, and a running back. He often told me when I was young that if I did not enjoy the feeling of getting punched in the face that I should not fight. When I took martial arts I was taught that the first principle of conflict was that if I was unwilling to match the intensity of my opponent and accept the worst possible outcome that I should not enter the conflict. I am writing what follows in response to an exchange I had on Facebook with a member of the Institute of Classical Osteopathy on the Society for Osteopathic Wellness page. Continue reading