Where Did The Progress Go?

American FlagMy father was an American. My father was a wrestler (he had several scholarship offers but got drafted in to the Navy during the Vietnam War), a boxer, and a running back. He often told me when I was young that if I did not enjoy the feeling of getting punched in the face that I should not fight. When I took martial arts I was taught that the first principle of conflict was that if I was unwilling to match the intensity of my opponent and accept the worst possible outcome that I should not enter the conflict. I am writing what follows in response to an exchange I had on Facebook with a member of the Institute of Classical Osteopathy on the Society for Osteopathic Wellness page. Continue reading

It is all in the HOW!

IMG_0109Through my evolution as a young Operator the ART of Osteopathy is becoming more and more clear. It is not that it is an endeavor such as painting a picture or taking a beautiful photograph, it is more so that there is a physiological reality of response to stimuli and the Operator is responsible for knowing that and applying this knowledge to the way in which they INTERACT with the patient (physical touch is not the only part of the interaction, the conversation matters as does the general environment…). As Brandon Stevens often tells students at the Canadian Academy of Osteopathy you need to be easy on the senses (as an Osteopath and as a human being in general). Continue reading

Because Functional Anatomy Says So #2

I am looking to get on a bit of a roll here…as long as I don’t get exhausted again I should be able to manage it! Robert Johnston (the Principal with Principles) speaks about his myogonal theory to students of the CAO and there are certain muscles that have a lot of functional anatomical connections which end up being very important to an Osteopathic Operator. Within Mr. Johnston’s myogons, the lower/base myogon is very much affected by the psoas. My goal right now is to highlight some of the major functional anatomical conections with the psoas and start to speak about why using the psoas is so powerful in treatment. Continue reading

Because Functional Anatomy Says So #1

Having finished my first round of second year exams a little over a month ago I have been in a bit of a recovery period…it won’t last too long as there are more exams coming up. My intention at the moment is to begin writing about the REASON that there is an order to treatment that is guided by principle (from the base up and down then the center out). Right now I will start with the reason that the neck is GENERALLY worked with in the latter stages of a treatment. Continue reading

What Osteopathy Has Done For Me

As an Osteopathic student, I think it is safe to say that Osteopathy has had a major impact on my life. I had been working in an inter-disciplinary clinic for almost three years before I started class at the Canadian Academy Of Osteopathy. Before Osteopathy I was a Kinesiologist without a path, without desire, without meaning in my work. Due to some very personal motivation I found the CAO in a way that could best be described as serendipitous. I was looking for a way to improve my skills as a health care provider and I found a program, a profession, and a philosophy that has already changed my life (I have barely even started this journey but the differences are massive). Continue reading