Observe, Imagine, Perform

IMG_1378The video below will utilize 4 research papers as the basis for what is discussed (find them at the following links: Paper 1, Paper 2, Paper 3, Paper 4). These papers, taken together, speak about the concepts of motor observation (watching a motor skill performed by another) and motor observation (the cognitive process of motor actions being internally stimulated without producing an overt action). The video will discuss these concepts as well as display ways they may be utilized when learning skills in manual therapeutics.

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Stop Moving if you Want to Feel the Change…

IMG_1383The phenomenon of changing tactile sensitivity during goal directed movement is described in a paper found here. The essential concept from the paper is that during preparation (the part where you think about what you are going to do) and cessation (the part where you have done what you were doing) of goal directed movement an individual is more sensitive to tactile stimuli then they are during execution of goal directed movement (the part where you are actually moving). The take away message that is discussed in the video below is simply that, if you are attempting to accurately identify tactile stimuli with a given hand it should be still…

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More Reasons to Keep Your Hands and Eyes on the Prize

IMG_1347As we continue looking back to the general concepts put forward on this site we are able to continue finding information that suggests there may be something to them. With the concept of multisensory integration leading to the heuristic statement of “Keep Your Hands and Eyes on the Prize” we are able to further identify information showing the general usefulness of the concept. One such paper may be found here and it displays that attention to the task allows for improved capacity to detect tactile change (which might be a big deal for those using their hands therapeutically). Please enjoy the video below.

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Change the Way you Use it…

IMG_1388Below is a short video speaking about a research paper that may be found here. The general concept is that the normal use of the middle and index finger together lead to learning being transferred from the middle finger to the index finger more readily than from the middle to the ring (middle finger learns and, without training the index passively learns more than the ring). With that short preamble please take a look at the video below…

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Keep Your Hands and Eyes (Most of the Time) on the Prize

IMG_1345Here we will take a look at more concepts related to multisensory integration. Over time the aim is to continue looking in to research topics and identifying information that may be placed in to a clinically valuable context. Please enjoy!

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More Demonstration: Contact is Control (Again)

IMG_1317As with all of the other concepts I am choosing to highlight, the concept that contact is control and control is safety will receive further demonstration in video form. The big deal here is that broad contact allows for the connection of all the concepts I identify and demonstrate. I speak about the uniting feature of broad contact and display it in the two videos below. I also take a moment to speak about the idea of using a practitioner’s leg as an extra point of contact and control with attention to some of the pros and cons that are normal in doing so.

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Applying Concepts: Get Those Rotators!

IMG_1306As I have been building a library of concepts I have also been attempting to build a library of demonstrations of those concepts. Here I provide some ideas on working with the rotator cuff and the hip rotators. While they are different in details of anatomical structure the concepts of assessment, palpation, patient positioning, relational motion, and patient control all still apply. Take a look!

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