Stop Working So Hard!

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Here we demonstrate and discuss how two concepts (Contact is Control and The Space Between us is Unstable) work together to help minimize practitioner effort.

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Hold it Right…

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Here we discuss the benefits of establishing a good initial hold as guided by the concept that Contact is Control as well as the concepts of Patient Positioning. When a practitioner establishes an effective initial hold there are many treatment options available with minimal effort.

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Figure out the Similarities…

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Here we discuss direct barrier treatment methods. Instead of describing specific techniques or systems we point to the consistent similarities in application in the form of long holds, patient active contraction, and repetitive articulation/rhythmic motion.

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Indirect Commonalities…

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Here we take a general look at the commonalities of BLT/LAS, FPR, and the indirect portion of Still Technique as they are described. The simple commonality is that all indirect treatment systems (even the ones not directly spoken about) are guided by softening of soft tissues as the signal of appropriate application in progress.

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Please Don’t Hurt ‘Em…

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Here we discuss the concept guiding the choice to use the direct or indirect barrier in treatment. As the video will highlight, the aim is to choose the method that does not provoke pain in the patient.

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Make a Good Choice…

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Here we discuss the utilization of activating forces in osteopathic treatment. The aim is to provide an algorithmic approach to which force(s) to use in a given situation. The video is below, followed by a written description of the concept.

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Make it Easy…

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Here we take an overarching look at indirect treatment methods. The aim is to describe the uniting concept with all of the systems in that we aim to make soft tissues in the region of interest palpably soften. “Ease” is identified through palpatory softening.

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